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Frodnew's 1989, Model 15, 6v92, 102" wide

This is a public forum. This forum will be a place to show your Project Eagle and updates on progress you have made. Please make one thread with your project and put all updates in the same thread. Sorry... Eagles only.


Jim/Walter:

I'm not discouraged yet. I've been asking myself if I would've still purchased the bus if I knew these issues were evident and the answer is probably no. I would've continued to wait things out till something else was a "dryer" fit but I have her now and will focus on what needs to be done and get it done.

Jim:
You mentioned options of the roof. Personally, I feel that the roof will need to be taken down to the bare metal/fiberglass. If I'm going to do this, or hire someone else with the right tools/experience, I might as well have it done right. If I was to do this myself, what do you suggest on scraping, sanding and other? Would Harbor Freight be the store for this stuff or should I go online or elsewhere? Do you think a special drill or sander is necessary and if so, what kind and what should I be aware of on using it?
I'll contact the guy who did the work on the filter/fluids changes and ask him about the brakes and what he adjusted.

Walter:
You also mention taking the roof down to the bare bones. I agree. I mean, look at that roof! Same questions for you that I asked Jim. What is your advice on me doing the job myself for tools? I also need to mention that I have two old, broken down, leaking A/C units which I'm probably going to replace so project planning has to be careful.
The lot manager said that he had about 20-25 gallons of Dicor that he would give me to seal the roof. Should I consider using this for now by rolling it on as a temporary fix till I have all my marbles together for tools and equipment for the actual bare bones roof project?
There is a company in town that does specialize coating RV roofs with the rubber material you're talking about. I can easily call them up, ask who's in charge of making decisions and email them the photos, or, do you think a personal visit is better?

As far as the oil, I'll contact the mechanic and grill him about the grade/brand of oil, and if he analyzed it. You mentioned pulling oil with a kit. Where can I get one? Where does one take this oil to have it analyzed or do I do this myself?
I'll also ask him about the grease fittings and see what number he tells me that he greased. I wish there was a schematic of where these guys are because I'm going to the bus tomorrow (Thur) to get personal with her again. I'll be sure to wear something that allows me to get better visuals and look for the tell tale signs of rust on the fittings you mentioned.

I'm ready to learn and especially ready to take on some of this stuff. I'm a visual learner so the more pictures I can imagine in my head, the better on getting things done properly and efficiently. I truly appreciate you guys helping me out. I'm excited and at the same time, a little flustered on what I'm finding out about the bus but I'm going to focus on the big picture and get this beauty looking like a proper lady.

More updates tomorrow!
frodnew
 
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Eric, you have no reason to be discouraged about this bus, it drove beautifully, it looks good in general, and so far there are no serious mechanical issues. Your only trouble spots are some leaks on the roof, and botched roof coatings. There are many people who have gotten into buses and suffered far worse. Fixing the roof will be tedious, but it will be out in the open in good weather. I should be so lucky.

The first thing I would do is establish which A/C's work, and whether they are worth keeping. A few months from now it will get hot again, and you will need A/C to be able to work inside the coach. If there are no electric outlets within reach, get a used one or rent a small generator to power the A/C's. If one does work, keep it temporarily at least, and chuck the one that does not. You can put a piece of plywood covered with plastic over the hole secured on the inside. That can be your access hole to get up on the roof and start scraping and sanding. That rubberized tar-like coating will not sand off. You will probably need to use a small propane torch to soften it up and scrape it off with various sizes and styles of scrapers. You will have to experiment to find what works best. Keep in mind that the sheet metal this is all on is aluminum with two rows of rivets at every seam, and single rivets elsewhere. You do not have a perfectly level surface to scrape on, or sand on. Paint strippers will work on the enamel that is underneath, but not on that gobbledygook on top. Get the goop off, and never consider ever putting it back on. Thank those that offered you Dicor, but hope that you find someone who will help you with Urethane paint. One thing I noticed in the pictures is that the goop got awfully close to the roof marker lights, and perhaps on them. The light bases are not made any more, but the lenses are available. Do your best to safeguard those lights because they get brittle sitting in the sun for years. Unless you can get some off a salvaged bus, if you loose one, you are cooked.

NAPA stores sell oil test kits, and truck parts stores. Some of the service garages at Love's Truck Stops can test oil on the spot, most places you have to wait for results from the Lab. The only place I got a test kit with suction tubes was a Caterpillar Machinery Dealer, and it was expensive. As far as sanders go, body shops use air powered ones mostly, but you might not have that option. Fine sanding of the roof won't be as necessary as elsewhere on the coach because it is not so visible (unless I come around with a folding ladder). Check out all the possible equipment at Auto Body Toolmart, abtm.com, they have everything. The best approach is to get the thick junk off, use paint stripper safe for aluminum to get the enamel and primer off (Citristrip works). That way you have a clean surface without disturbing the rivets, which, by the way, need to be inspected individually for missing ones or loose ones, and replaced as necessary. You need rivets that will seal properly, not the cheap pop rivets in the hardware store. Check Bus Conversion Magazine for rivet supplier ads.

One possibility for paint is the three step system Urethanes offered by KBS Coatings (kbs-coatings.com)in Valparaiso, Indiana. They can be brushed on with a fine brush in thin coats, and they work on aluminum and fiberglass. You could do one section at a time, ending at each seam. If you can mask off the existing paint on the rest of the coach in a neat pattern, you could have a white roof that would look presentable, and last for years. Check marine sites on the internet, people with boats have been using brushed on enamel for decades with good results. They have techniques that are quite good. It takes longer than spraying, but are you willing to get into that? Hiring someone to do your roof properly will cost thousands, unless you get someone with a bucket of Dicor and a roller (Eagle sacrilege).

Another thing to check is whether whoever installed the A/C's put proper framing in the ceiling under the roof sheet metal. If not, the heavy A/C's might be sagging and causing puddling (and leaks). Now get to work, I expect you to be working just as hard as I am on my own. :roll:
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
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Walter:

I really needed your words of encouragement. Actually, both of us did (wife and I) because of the long day we had trying to ask people who owned RVs and/or buses about our situation. Stopping at a large garage on the way to the lot where the bus is located is company called RVRoof.com, home of the original sprayed RV roof called FlexArmor.
The product is impressive, the staff knowledgeable and helpful, the work outstanding. Plenty of photo books of their before/after jobs and you can actually watch/see the staff working on projects. The product is lifetime, so they say. We looked at their inside displays of a regular RV roof while the other half was applied with their product. Remember as you read this that I'm only asking to learn and gather ideas. The owner is who I spoke to and when I showed him the same photos I uploaded above of my roof, he said that his guys actually would take all the gunk off, scrape it down and sand it to the metal, tape it off and begin the process. However, as we continued to talk, I was told that if I was to purchase some new A/C's, to let them put them on. If I want to mount a ham antenna, solar panels, vent covers, etc... that I should make sure it's all pre-installed and working first to be sure that each piece is going to fit and stay permanently. After they put the product on, the staff prefer to put the A/C's and everything else back on.
Cost I was told was $170 a running foot. The white part of the roof on my bus is not a full 40' but if I do the math and take it to the edge at say, 40' x $170, I get the answer you gave me (in the thousands) but it's lifetime, they'll do all the labor of love and will even put the products back on the roof. Total time: 2-3 days.

OK, let me get back to reality. The lot manager where the bus is located agreed with all you said and told me that care would be needed to remove that gunk. He said that some hand scrapers would/could be of use and to be careful of the rivets. He mentioned not to go anywhere the lights till I have new ones including any gaskets. Again, good call! He continued to tell me pretty much what you explained and that once the gunk was off, to use a hand drill and a wheel brush and/or a wire brush. Get all the seams down to the metal. If there are any holes, to look into some marine grade products to patch it up. When it comes to the rivets, he wasn't sure what type this bus has or what tool is needed to apply it but I'll do what you said and see if I can call all the rivet companies and shoot them any pics they need to give an assessment. In the case of just getting the roof covered and sealed, he said to consider getting some of that stuff you see on TV called Flex Seal in a can. He said to get enough of the stuff, spray the seals and around the A/C's and then he had 4-5 x 5 gallon buckets of the Dicor stuff I could roll/brush on just to keep the water out till I got the better products. I'll certainly look into the stuff you mentioned!

As far as the A/C's go, the lot manager said he knows a man who can come over and test ours. I'll ask him to make the call to this guy and see if we can get it done asap. Eventually, I'm going to need a good generator or inverter/generator. We're not sure which one is better (if we have the money to buy either). Wife and I have been researching this for years and have come to the conclusion that we don't want a loud heavy diesel type. We've looked into almost all the gas engine types and based on noise, years of service, ease of maintenance, that Honda still beats out everyone. They make an 8000 watt which is top ranked and though other companies are getting quieter, we felt that the largest Honda, as costly as it is, would be the right one time purchase. We also have been meeting quite a few RVers in the lot, all with Cummins, Onan types. In fact, our new neighbor pulled up tonight in a 40', brand new RV. Generator was 8500 Cummins, diesel. Said it works well, handles his two 15's A/C units easily, but noise is still an issue in campgrounds. He told me the Honda is expensive but a good choice and even after hours would be hard to detect if running but be sure that I have it set on springs so it doesn't rattle on start up.

Oil: I'll make the call to some truck stops and see if I can't drive the bus to them for a test. If this is all that's needed for an analysis, then Loves' Truck Stops will be my stop. I did call up the guy who did the oil change and he said that used Shell Rotella 40w. He said it was the one specifically for my bus. He said with his service, unless a company has something different, that for a bus like mine, I would want to do an oil change about every 10,000 miles, lube/grease the bus every 5,000 miles, and do the tranny about 25,000 miles since I don't use synthetic. This is what he told me.

Lube/grease: I checked under the bus and got personal. Boy, there is not much room under them! Based on what I can see, he hit many but not all. He uses Texas Red. He was honest and said that he hit as many as he could find. Honestly, I'm amazed he hit as many as he did because the dirt around those areas are caked on. Personally, I'd like to go back down there with some flathead screwdrives and just start scraping that stuff off and using a brush to expose the nipples better. Even better is to know where all the nipples are!

Brakes: Same guy said that the brakes are in good order and adjust the slack with a pry bar with 1/2" to 1" travel. He said depending on my driving habits that this should be done between 5,000 to 10,000 miles.

Tomorrow: I'll see if I can remember to measure the height of the lowest part of the bus to the ground and from the top part of the tires to the wheel well. Test the A/C's, continue to check for leaks because we have a 60% chance of rain tomorrow for about 6 hours. I'll go about ordering a new emergency hatch or one up on what was originally installed with a vent cover or both. Look into A/C units and keep whichever one is working. Make a lot of phone calls to the product companies you listed and to Love's for an oil analysis.

Before I head to bed. A few more questions. The floor looks to be linoleum. It needs to come off. Should I use a floor scraper or is there something better/easier? I had a guy mention that a marine grade subfloor would work well.

Windshield has a small spider web crack. Should I use something like what Rain X has put out to fill in cracks? Or, is there something else to prevent the crack from expanding?

Tires: I checked them tonight and I got different measurements from each. Front tires were 110/114psi. The first axle in the back was 102/92psi, the tag was 108/110 and 111/113psi. Not sure if it's the way the bus is sitting because it's not on level ground or not but it's obvious, I have to keep an eye on each one and be sure they're inflated to the proper psi on a daily basis. Any suggestions on a tire checking system or just stick to the manual method right now?

Thanks again for all the input. It means a lot.
frodnew
 
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Eric, you are doing exactly what I always recommend and that is to research each step of your project carefully. The more folks you ask, the more you will learn. That said, you will generally get varied thoughts and that means you will have to sort out the best answer for your situation.

The Rotella 40 W is fine. That is what I used in my 6V92 when before I went to the Series 60. Oil is a very controversial subject on the internet, but if you sort out the BS/personal opinions, most 40W oils should be OK. As Walter mentioned, it should be CF2 rated, but most 40W oils today should be able to pass that test. Best to check anyway.

Personally, I would not do an oil analysis right now. Your oil is too new to tell you much and the bus will be sitting for quite a while.

Concerning the roof. Walter's approach is great, but the vendor you talked to might be a good option. If they truly take it down to bare metal/fiberglass and use a proven quality product, I would not be afraid of that option. That said, I would make sure that I did some research to verify that they are a quality vendor.

Concerning the floor. Folks have used a variety of methods. Some take out all the floor/rails and start over with various materials (many use tongue and groove plywood). Some go to the other extreme (like me) and simply cover the current floor with carpet and padding. If I were to do it again, I would probably remove the rails, add another layer of plywood and then use some sort of hard flooring and throw rugs. Ton of options. My only fairly strong recommendation is to somehow find a way to provide the same floor access that the factory provided. This would be especially true of the openings over the engine. Without those, it is almost impossible to change anything on the back of the engine (PS, air compressor, etc.). Open up the current hatches and you will see what I mean.

Concerning the generator. Some folks go the gasoline route, but that means you have to have yet another fuel on board. Many (most?) of us here have gone the diesel generator route and are very happy with having a very robust system. If you are concerned about your neighbors, you can buy a removable stack system that will route the exhaust to the roof. Some folks even build in a permanent roof vented system. If you go gas, you need to make sure that the unit you buy is rated for an enclosed (but vented) compartment. Cheap construction generators should not be used in a compartment. I am not sure if the Hondas (great generators) are rated for use in a compartment.

The latest generator technology is the inverter generator, where the engine does not have to run at a constant RPM. Frankly I hate them. If you are noise/sound sensitive, the constant fluctuation of the RPM (due to load changes) will drive you crazy.

Concerning the windshield. I would be tempted to use a good window repair kit and grind a divot at the end of the crack (much like to drill a hole in cast iron to stop a crack from progressing).

I am even more concerned about the description of the brake "adjustment" done by the vendor. Again, you should have automatic brake adjusters. It is difficult (and tricky) to do a manual adjustment with them. It sounds like they did the correct check to make sure arm travel is withing limits, but they should not have had to do any adjustment nor should you have to do any adjustment. Again, you should CHECK to make sure the automatic adjusters are doing their job periodically. Since there could be an issue, I would check them after every significant trip.

Checking brakes using a pry bar is an acceptable procedure. However, it is much easier to air up the bus and have someone apply the brakes and observe the travel at each wheel location. This will require that you crawl under the bus (do it safely). This process will also let you listen for any air leaks in the brake (or other) systems.

Jim
Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
'85 Eagle 10 with Series 60 & Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission - not at all fancy, but fully functional
Bus Project pages: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
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Thanks Jim, for sharing the load, but I am kind of disappointed that more people have not chimed in to help Eric considering that this thread has been viewed over 800 times.

Eric, everything Jim said plus a few tidbits:

That FlexArmor might be a substantial product for someone who has an RV and lots of loose cash, but I doubt that you want to spend 60% of what you paid for the bus to do the roof. Slap yourself on the head, do not waste your time with a highly overpriced product. The "Lifetime" guarantee might only be for what they consider is the remaining useful life of the coach, not your lifetime. You will have about 35' of white roof area times $170, which is $5950, crazy. The fact that they said they would sand down to the bare metal indicates that they do not realize you have rivet heads sticking up.

Flex Seal is TV scam junk.

Research rivets through the Bus Conversion Magazine forum, this forum, or Bus Nuts Online. Rivet providers do not want to see pictures of your roof. Check company websites and ask for catalogs. Get The Bus Converters Bible by Dave Galey. There are many kinds of rivets and you need to know more about them to make intelligent decisions, and you need a good rivet gun to put them on with.

It might be a good deal to have someone test the A/C's, but know how much he is going to charge first.

The subject of generators was discussed in my first message to you on 17 Aug 18. I stand by what I said, a diesel generator is the most appropriate and durable situation for your Eagle. 8000 kw is not enough power, you need more than two roof A/C's for going down the road. Assuming the original coach A/C does not work, or is gone, you will need three to five roof A/C's to stay cool on the road, one or two while parked.

Check with the Truck Stops before you go there for details. They might only sample the oil for you when they are changing your oil. They might test your oil if you bring a sample in, but get that clear. As Jim said, there is not much need to sample it now, it was just changed, and it appears that it is the correct grade. The oil change intervals are in the right range, that is something you have to decide on, it is your money.

As I thought (I should have placed a bet), you did not get every point greased, and, if you had gotten some Eagle manuals by now, you would have a way to know exactly where they are. I guess no manuals came with the Eagle. The brakes concern me too, having the proper amount of slack is good, but no mention was made of what percentage of brake lining is left.

In measuring the suspension height, you may have what to do messed up. You measure from the ground vertically up the center of the wheels to the inner edge of the wheel opening trim. In your case, it is a black rubber molding. Judging by the pictures, your Eagle seems to be sitting a little low. The measurement at each wheel, all around (when level) should be 47-48", ideally.

I thought the passenger windshield was replaced, or is the crack on the driver's side? If the crack is coming up from the edge, it will be free to spread wherever and whenever it wants. Drilling the end of the crack might work, but then, do you feel that lucky?

I would not worry about stripping the floor just yet. You need to assess how solid all of the plywood is underneath by standing on it everywhere, and checking it underneath for rot. If you add thickness to the floor it will decrease your headroom (it should be 6' 2" or 3" now). Depending on who you invite into your coach, you might need every inch available. There is also the quandary of what to do with your access hatches in the floor. You will deeply regret doing away with them or covering them up. You need to have a plan for what you will put in the coach furnishings and structure wise that takes everything into account. That vinyl will serve you well for the time being, and the metal rails are good anchor points. I helped a family from Texas look at an Eagle in Knoxville last year, and the coach had several problems. One was the fact that every hatch was covered up with furniture and carpeting. They bought the Eagle (anyway), and within 60 miles on the way back, the air compressor gave it up, and the repair place had to tear the back room up extensively to get to the air compressor.

And lastly, the tire pressures. You are exposing some rookie greenness here. I thought you were going to check the tire pressures before you left NC, not after you got to Florida. You heard the story about closing the gate after the horse got out, right? The pressures you are reading now are all too high. Your Model 15 might be different, but on a Model 10, the front axle is 105, and every other position is 90 psi. Your tire inflation pressures are stated on the VIN plate which is probably in the fire extinguisher cabinet by the front door. The front axle is the front, the next axle going toward the rear is the bogie (you do not have a tag axle), and the rear duals are the drive axle. Only Model 1 Eagles have tag axles (unless someone made a custom arrangement), Model 05's, 10's, 15's, and 20's, have bogie axles ahead of the drive axle. You do not need to check the tire pressures daily if it is just sitting. :roll:
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
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DoubleEagle
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Wow! I love you guys! You just gave me a good ass whippin' and it felt good! Love hurts ;-)

Today, Maria and I got on the roof and scraped. It's late, I'm hungry and I'll add pics and a better, more suited update tomorrow. We stuck to the seams, watched for those rivets and clearly understand why Walter's approach might be the best solution. $6,000 for a lifetime guaranteed rubber coated roof is nice, especially IF they took the roof down to the metal and did not bust off the heads of the rivets but Walter, as you say, I'm skeptical, too. The point of going was to talk, gather intel, get a quote, listen and learn to what they do. Doing the math of course is obvious but for now, our goal is to continue to get the seams sealed up and stop leaking temporarily. Time is against us at the moment, the bus is outside and I'm studying, researching, emailing, asking, as many people as possible, but nuts and RV owners. i'm not afraid to hear different opinions but learn from them and, as Jim said, work thru the best possible solution based on what we're dealing with.

So, again, to keep this short, we're going to Titusville, Fl to some RV resort that holds bus rallies. This one is an antique bus rally and we're praying we can get in, head straight to the Eagle owners, get pics, take names, ask a TON of questions or simply let the photos do it for me. We received some photos already of some buses and they looked beautiful! I know I'll be blown away and it's possible, you guys will know who owns the buses. I'll do my best to get the best pics, names, etc...

Thank you, guys!
frodnew
 
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Ok I will chime in like Walter wants us to!

The factory floor in my bus (1968 05) consisted of linoleum with an 1/8 inch of padding beneath it. On my bus it was rotten in many places, you just need to walk around and feel for squishiness. Your bus Is much newer, not sure if you will have that issue. Since mine was rotten, I did not even try to scrape it off, but if you scrape enough, I think It could be done. 1/2 " ply wood on top of the existing floor might be best.

You are doing the roof correctly in my eyes. Scrape it down to aluminum and you will have a good roof. Please take lots of pics!

And yes I think that a diesel generator is definitely the best option, if it is in the budget, of course!


Remember, Have FUN!
1968 05 eagle with 8v71 and Eaton Fuller 9 speed
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Hi Guys!

It's been a few days since I posted but we went to the bus rally in Titusville and happened to come upon quite a few people that you all probably know well and some. The rally wasn't big at all but Maria and I were the first to arrive and the last to leave. We spent hours talking to every owner, many of them Eagles, and some. Names such as...Scott Crosby of Mobile Vintage Bus Service, Jimmy and Sadie Clay of the Iron Horse Eagle, and more. One name in particular came up by everyone, and I mean, everyone. John Batton of Bushnell, Fl. I've already given Scott a call since he's in the St. Augustine area and will be giving "JB" a call tomorrow to talk shop and see if we can't arrange a visit.

In the meantime, we did our homework. We wrote notes, took photos, asked questions and showed these folks our bus. All of them said the same things:
1. Start with the foundation and make sure that it's sound and I mean sound! JB was the man to talk to so we'll see what we can arrange.
2. Work on the roof exactly as you guys have been saying. The past two days, that's what we've been doing. Photos have been taken and I will post but not tonight.
3. The emergency exit came out. It had to. The cost to replace one was crazy high and it just seemed like a better idea to get the right thickness of aluminum and cover the area. That, too, has photos which I'll post soon.
4. I was able to work out some battery issues with cleaning them up. They were really dirty and some of the connections were bad. Those were replaced and it's solid now.
5. Lightbulbs on the body have been replaced carefully as to not hurt the lenses. She's not a Christmas tree at night but she's pretty to me.
6. The floor in a couple areas are mushy. At the back of the bus there is a tear in the floor. When the time comes, we'll probably rip it up, determine what damage is underneath and come back and show you guys and ask questions again. Some folks at the rally suggested marine grade plywood as a subfloor.
7. Tires: I did check the plate of the bus for the right psi. All the tires are now at the correct psi and maintaining them well. Thank you guys for guiding me on this.
8. Generators: You guys are spot on with your suggestion on going with a diesel generator. Most folks at the rally were eager to show us theirs. Onan super quiets, Kubuto engines, they were all big, quiet when turned on for show (with muffler systems that went up the side of the buses) and exactly what we need. Like you guys said, our bus will fair better with it. In the meantime, we did purchase a Predator 3500w Inverter/Generator for the jobs we've been doing on the bus. Super quiet, purchased at a great price and with the 2 year warranty of basically, "if you kill it, bring it back for a new one". How could we go wrong? Did I mention it's quiet? It'll do fine for us at small events but we will get the Onan or something of diesel quality. We were told by someone at the rally that JB recently took one out of a bus and so we're going to ask him about it.

It's 1am and I still need to shower. I'll finish here by saying that everyone, including you guys on the forum, have been nothing but fabulous on assisting me and Maria. We're going to continue to work on the roof and hopefully finish it up by this weekend. We've been lucky with the weather so far and we're taking advantage of the warm weather and sunshine. We're taking baby steps but are doing all that you guys tell us and are starting to see the light. I'll post those pics soon and keep you all updated as well.
Eric
frodnew
 
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Eric The tire pressure from the plate is OK, but the best way is to weigh the bus and adjust the tire pressure according to the tire manufacture weight chart.
Wayne
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rusty
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Eric, it was wise to go to the rally, the extra eyes on your Eagle will really help you. On the issue of the emergency hatch, you might have found some sky-high prices, but they can be found for under $300 at school bus supply places new, and at salvage yards that have school buses. The key thing is knowing what size you have, some are square, some are rectangular. You really should have one or two emergency exits, because if your Eagle ever ended up on it's side, that is your easy way out. They were required on buses in the eighties and on for good reasons. Some people use them to mount roof A/C's, but I do not think it is a good idea to eliminate them.

What tire pressures were indicated on your VIN plate? Those are for a loaded passenger bus, but will do you in the meantime. As Wayne pointed out, the truly sophisticated way is to weigh the bus to get the weight on each axle, and then go by the tire manufacturer charts, but that will be after you finish converting in a few years (or decades). :D
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
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