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Frodnew's 1989, Model 15, 6v92, 102" wide

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I would not worry too much about gelling, it does not get cold enough along the east coast to cause problems most winters. If you were up along the Northern border in New England, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, etc., where gets to be way below zero for days and days, then the fuel can get thick. The fuel is constantly being warmed by passing through the engine and being returned to the tank, so it does not stay at air temperature for very long. It would be more important to check the condition of your tires and air pressure, and the adjustment of your brakes.
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
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DoubleEagle
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Thank you Walter for the reply. I'm very happy to hear this news. The condition of the front tires are still with good tread. In the back, 6 tires were replaced and those are new. I'll have a heavy duty truck pressure gauge with me and will be sure that before I leave the yard it's sitting in that all is checked again. Same with the brakes.
Thanks everyone!
frodnew
 
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If it is in the 50s during the day, I don't think you will have to worry about gelling.
DoubleEagle wrote: The fuel is constantly being warmed by passing through the engine and being returned to the tank, so it does not stay at air temperature for very long.

It is just when you are trying to start the engine when you can have problems. If it is that warm, I don't think you will have to worry about gelling.


Good Luck!
1968 05 eagle with 8v71 and Eaton Fuller 9 speed
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Finally some good news. Transmission fluid and the filter (located inside the tranny), I was told, made a huge difference in the way it drives now that this has been done. Nobody has records on when all that was changed the last time. My question to you guys is what do you remember the cost being on having only the fluid and filter changed? I understand the tranny is practically bullet proof so am hoping this is the least of my worries at this point.
The passenger wiper blade motor brought the wiper over to the side but would not come back. My understanding is that the motors work by air and it leaked enough to make it stop half way. That was changed out and is working. The blower/defroster was also fixed.
The mechanic that worked on all this really had quite a day of going through everything to double check wiring and mechanical. I feel good knowing that extra time was done to do this because I'm heading up to NC next week to get her. Very excited!
If the weather maintains (my accu-weather forecast says rain only, no snow) then we should be good to go. I'll be sure to check the brakes, tires, pressure and everything else you all have reminded me about. I appreciate everyone's input and advice. Have a great weekend!
Eric
frodnew
 
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Stock wipers use air "motors". When they get old, they can be a challenge. They can be rebuilt or you can buy rebuilt units. Some folks inject oil intended for air tools into the system and that helps a bit.

There is an old thread that touches on the subject: http://eagles-international.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=491&p=3819&hilit=air+wipers&sid=0097e6b6f4f3353bb4deda4341041c38&sid=f0ffcbb081af11fcf0c9d07ed8d5dfd9#p3819

There are lots of folks that have converted to electric wiper systems. Here is one thread: http://eagles-international.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=2781&hilit=air+wipers&sid=f0ffcbb081af11fcf0c9d07ed8d5dfd9

Jim
Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
'85 Eagle 10 with Series 60 & Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission - not at all fancy, but fully functional
Bus Project pages: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
Blog: http://beltguy.com/blog/
Email: jim@eaglesinternational.net Note: Email sent to the this address requesting technical advice will not receive a response
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beltguy
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Jim:
Thank you for the info and links. Good stuff to know. The mechanic who did all the work on the tranny, wiper motor and defroster said he had another motor there. The option was there to leave the motor as is but it wouldn't work or change it out. I opted for the latter as I'd like two working wipers coming home. Weather is supposed to be raining anyway so let's just get it done and be safe. I also bought a nice big spray bottle of Rain-X on sale and will be using that before the drive (if it's dry to do so). Am keeping eye on the weather and crossing fingers for a safe trip up and back to Fla. Updates when avail.
Thanks all!
frodnew
 
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frodnew wrote:Finally some good news. Transmission fluid and the filter (located inside the tranny), I was told, made a huge difference in the way it drives now that this has been done. Nobody has records on when all that was changed the last time. My question to you guys is what do you remember the cost being on having only the fluid and filter changed? I understand the tranny is practically bullet proof so am hoping this is the least of my worries at this point.
Eric


I can't tell you how much a reasonable garage would charge because I have never paid a garage to do it. The cost would be dependent on what type of fluid was used (regular or synthetic), the cost of the filters (there should be an external spin-on as well), and what their labor charge is. Ask them to break the charges and time down, the labor rate should be somewhere around $100 an hour. Everything you pay a garage to do on a bus will cost more than you have been accustomed to in the past (unless you own a boat or an exotic sports car). ;)
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
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DoubleEagle
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Your advice is noted and appreciated. I might be paying quite a bit more to get this bus ready for the drive down right now but for the future, I'll be sure to do my homework and call as many places as I can to get their prices and all the breakdowns. It's interesting. I have a car and if I can't change the oil due to a lack of time, I look around for oil change place and can usually find one that offers the deal and type I want. Service is hit/miss so I usually follow up and double check it in the lot before I leave. Too many stories of the plug not being put back in or something wasn't tightened.
With the bus, I have a Detroit 6v92and an HT470. I'm not sure if I need a mechanic that specifically works on Detroits to do oil/transmission fluid/filter changes or if this is something I can do myself. Personally, I prefer to do it myself but there's that list of, "What do I need" first as far as parts and a catchment system for the fluids. Second is the "Here's what I would do with your model 15 to change each type and what to watch/look out for".
If tools are needed, where might I find them and what kind? Going back to my car, I have tools and every single one has been of use on making sure my car ('98 Mazda Protege) stays running. Tools in the sense that I don't have many, just the right amount to take apart and put back together from the engine, body, tranny, etc... I don't need anymore. I would like to do this with the bus, too, but only if it's necessary for keeping on the bus. I don't want to be carrying the Sears tool dept if I can help it.
One last thing, I have heard that there are companies that have either books, cd's or thumbdrive options for schematics on the body, engine and transmission of most buses. They cost a few hundred dollars but explain how to take apart the bus and put it back together. I can already see that most of you guys don't need it due to the years of working on your own buses but would these items be a good recommendation to have?
January is going to be much slower than December and a good time to research your feedback, call, email, ask, and order what I need if I see it's necessary. So, let me know. I'm willing to do the work if it's cheaper but need some help on parts, tools and instruction. Otherwise, if some things are simply too much a pain in the you know what then I'll make the calls for a mechanic that is Detroit certified. I know I'm asking the same questions many others have asked in the past but work with me, I want to learn and will do all I can to make the effort myself and if I can't then will always come back here to take it further. I love this Forum!
frodnew
 
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Eric, I hate to break it to you, but when you fell in love with this Eagle, you set yourself on a long journey of discovery. It is sort of like when you adopt a young stray cat that wanders in, and then you eventually realize that it might live for another twenty five years, and require constant maintenance. Well, the Eagle has wormed its way into your life, and now you have to take care of it. As far as finding a garage that knows 2 cycle Detroit's, you will be lucky if you find one, let alone having a choice. Any other facility might know trucks and buses with four cycle engines, but will be faking it when it comes to 2 cycles, and be learning about them at your expense. They can do brakes and change the oil, and fix air leaks, etc., but you will pay. It really seems that you can't have much of anything done without it costing a thousand or more. You will need to locate experienced retired mechanics or younger mechanics that worked on Detroit's in the military, or oil fields, or in maritime use.

The quickest way to get manuals would be to check coachinfo.com, they have all the manuals for Model 15's on hard copy or CD's. They also have engine manuals for the Series V92's. Complete sets for both the Eagle and the engine will be hundreds of dollars each. The slowest and cheapest way would be to check Craigslist and eBay for original Eagle and Detroit Diesel manuals that come up from time to time. I bought original manuals this way for as little as $50. The original manuals are the best because the images are clearer, and many parts are double and triple fold-outs that show things like lubrication points, and body parts. You can also buy Detroit Diesel manuals directly from DD, but they will be expensive. The most expensive way is to buy an Eagle that comes with a complete set of manuals (don't forget to ask the seller if he has any). The manuals will not tell you exactly how to take it apart and put it back together again, but the parts diagrams will show what was there originally, and what maintenance is required. It is assumed that there is some basic mechanical knowledge on the part of the reader.

Tool wise, I don't recommend going out and splurging on new tool sets without knowing just what you need for basic operations. I have been accumulating tools for over fifty years, and that includes air compressors, engine lifts, chain pullers, hydraulic presses, heavy jacks and stands, etc. I would look for heavier tools at auctions from the estates of former mechanics, or garages going out of business. Stick with quality brands like Wright Tool, Snap-on, Proto, or Armstrong. The main thing is to avoid foreign tools in general, and forget about current Sears Craftsman tools (get only the older professional ones made by Armstrong). Some of the Taiwanese or Japanese brands can be decent, but the serious tools that you can pass on decades from now are US made. 3/8" or 1/2" drives will serve some purposes, but you will also need 3/4" and 1" drives with impact sockets with sizes appropriate for taking off your wheels. Just changing the oil will require a large strap filter wrench, a drain pan that can handle the 6 1/2 gallons that will come out, and the wrench or socket that will take the drain plug out. You also might need to jack up a little with a twenty ton jack with a heavy jack stand or wooden blocks to support the bus (don't crawl under without supports that are appropriate). Another way is to build ramps you drive up on made from solid wood. Greasing all of the various points that need it will take longer than changing the oil, by the way. Get prepared to get dirty and greasy. That pretty well sums it all up (the dirty & greasy part). Be sure to get a gallon sized waterless hand cleaner jug with the pump (orange stuff with pumice grit), and mechanics nitrile gloves. The gloves help, but they make your hands sweat, and you eventually tear them on rough metal, but you get less black carbon under your fingernails. And remember, you will be saving money, and you will become intimate with your Eagle. :roll:
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
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DoubleEagle
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The Eagle has Landed.
Drove up to NC with a friend, traffic was so bad that we ended up staying the night and dealing with the paperwork the next day. The weather didn't help much either because it showed that there were leaks around both A/C units. It's a good thing the seats were taken out!
To top it off, this was something that was not supposed to be happening but hey, it's happening and I just accepted it.

My buddy drove the bus back due to my car not behaving and was very difficult to drive at slower speeds. The bus, however, drove beautifully. We also learned about some things that, again, I didn't know about. For example, a leaking roof. Speedometer light on dash doesn't work at night. Dome/map light above driver's seat doesn't work. One tail light (there are a few) is out. There is no key to the bus, no key to the bay doors, no way to lock the main door. The AC units on top are two different types and only work with a generator, which needs to be purchased, and to top it off, are connected by extension cords running from each. The whole bus system is set up for 12v not 24v, which is good and bad. Little things, right?

Getting intimate is about to happen. I'm heading to the lot where she's parked and am going to get started on the A/C units. I'll do a simple cover and tape with plastic for the time being to keep out the rain or water till I continue to gather intel on the other issues inside and out. I was also told to keep an eye on the oil and water level and to have some on board. I did some research and found that 40 weight is what I need but am not sure if there is a specific brand that really works well with the DD 2 stroke? Pics of this trip are not that great but will hopefully show you what I'm up against.
Attachments
Front AC Leak.JPG
Front AC Leak.JPG (90.59 KiB) Viewed 47 times
Extension Cable Leak.JPG
Each AC has an extension cable running thru the ceiling and lights. Cause of leaks?
Extension Cable Leak.JPG (112.57 KiB) Viewed 47 times
Emergency Hatch Bandaids.JPG
Emergency Hatch Bandaids.JPG (97.14 KiB) Viewed 47 times
Wet Floor to Back of Bus.JPG
Supposedly, stuff was sprayed around AC's but water has it's way
Wet Floor to Back of Bus.JPG (114.83 KiB) Viewed 47 times
Back Seat Area.JPG
Hole in floor on right side near window
Back Seat Area.JPG (114.25 KiB) Viewed 47 times
Maria at Wheel 1.JPG
My wife happy the bus is going home
Maria at Wheel 1.JPG (144.93 KiB) Viewed 47 times
frodnew
 
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