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About leveling...

This is a public forum to discuss Eagle related technical issues. If you are having a problem with your Eagle, this is the place to find help.
About leveling...
Tue Aug 07, 2018 10:45 pm


I don't have the resources to purchase or build a leveling system at the moment (nor the skill I suspect). We've suffered through without leveling at all so far. What would you guys suggest as a way to level out my Model 5? I've read people use boards (sounds sketchy) and I've seen lots of other RVs use various jacks and lego-like leveling blocks.

Seems like a jack system would do the least harm to the suspension. If that's so, where would be the best points under the bus to seat them?
bsimmons
 
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Re: About leveling...
Wed Aug 08, 2018 7:01 am


The easiest is to use boards if you are not to far off of level. Some times it is a bit of a challenge to drive up on the boards. If you use jacks and are not lifting the bus to high behind the front and back wheels will be fine.
Wayne
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rusty
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Re: About leveling...
Wed Aug 08, 2018 7:26 pm


As Wayne said, the structure behind the front wheels and behind the rear wheel is very strong. When you look at them you will see what we are talking about.

Both Wayne and I (and probably others) have fabricated our own hydraulic leveling systems. Wayne uses his quite a bit - mostly when parked to take a load off the torsilastics. I have only used mine when I service the bus (to jack it up) and when I was changing engines. We have not found any parking that is so bad we could not deal with it for a night or so.

Some folks have added air bags to both the front and drive axles - primarily to augment the torsilastics. However, the bags can be used to level the bus.

Jim
Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
'85 Eagle 10 with Series 60 & Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission - not at all fancy, but fully functional
Bus Project pages: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
Blog: http://beltguy.com/blog/
Email: jim@eaglesinternational.net Note: Email sent to the this address requesting technical advice will not receive a response
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beltguy
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Re: About leveling...
Wed Aug 08, 2018 8:26 pm


You guys forgot to tell him how many thousands of dollars it cost to put those levelers in. ;)
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
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DoubleEagle
 
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Location: Dayton, Ohio


Re: About leveling...
Wed Aug 08, 2018 8:49 pm


So 2x6's should do the trick then?
bsimmons
 
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Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2018 6:36 pm


Re: About leveling...
Thu Aug 09, 2018 6:06 am


bsimmons wrote:So 2x6's should do the trick then?


Maybe, if they are cut at a bevel and stepped up gradually. You might have trouble driving up on them otherwise with that high-geared manual.
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
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DoubleEagle
 
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Location: Dayton, Ohio


Re: About leveling...
Thu Aug 09, 2018 8:30 am


You really don't have much of a choice now but to build your own,I understand Big Foot will no longer install levelers on a Eagle any longer,they were around $4000.00 installed on Doyles Eagle.
I had 64,000 lbs HWH installed on my Eagle at HWH and by the time they got through running a beam across the front and beefing the rear it was almost $8,000.00 in 2001.
Keep your eyes open some times in Quartzsite I see the systems from a RV for $500.00 new in the box and you can make those work,about the only time I used mine was to take weight of the suspension in the shop
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luvrbus
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Re: About leveling...
Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:58 pm


Eventually I'm going to have to make some for my bus too. Does anyone have any blueprint/napkin plans of the ideal length, width, height for each of the models or is it a one size fits all leveling system?
What did you use for connecting the boards to each other and keeping them together?
Did you use special grips on the bottom or cut serrated edges so they don't slip?
Does anyone have photos they could attach?
This is a great subject that I enjoy speaking to others about because I've never been down this road before. The stories they tell of how you can roll a can of Coke across the floor or ending up on one side of the bed in the morning are pretty funny... till it happens to me. :-/
frodnew
 
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Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2018 8:55 pm


Re: About leveling...
Thu Nov 22, 2018 10:44 am


I built my own system. If you go to my project pages I have some detail there. I am in the process of re-writing those pages, but currently the discussion starts here: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject4.htm. Please note that the photos are thumbnails and can be enlarged.

Quite a while ago I made a table of components for this system. I have attached that document:

Component Table.doc
(10 KiB) Downloaded 12 times


I don't know if the components I list are still available, but you can check them out. The most important decision is the choice of cylinders and Northern still carries them: https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200311607_200311607?isSearch=992044-1007. I am very happy with these units.

For the cylinders, one of my concerns was to make sure the rod was of sufficient diameter to be stable when extended since our buses see some side load.

Most folks use a central hydraulic supply system. There are three options to supply the hydraulic pressure: engine driven pump, 12V pump and 120/240 electric motor driven pump. I tried one 12V pump (I think the one listed) and it did not have enough pressure. I currently use a dual engine hydraulic pump that supplies my PS system from one section and my charge air cooling fan from the other section. I have quick connect fitting in my charge air system and can hook up my jack system when needed.

I have never used my jack system for leveling. I have used it extensively for engine removal and servicing the bus on the under side.

Jim
Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
'85 Eagle 10 with Series 60 & Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission - not at all fancy, but fully functional
Bus Project pages: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
Blog: http://beltguy.com/blog/
Email: jim@eaglesinternational.net Note: Email sent to the this address requesting technical advice will not receive a response
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beltguy
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Re: About leveling...
Thu Nov 22, 2018 1:13 pm


I find it interesting that several people have indicated that they do not use the hydraulic levelers for leveling as much as jacking the coach up to work on it, or take the load off the torsilastics. I have two sets of new trailer landing gears (Jost Magnums) that I got real cheap (under $300 for all) at an auction that I think might work as levelers. The catch with them is that only one side has the low gear setting for cranking up a loaded trailer (the two stands are connected by a drive shaft). It seems that they would be excellent for jacking the coach up for servicing, and would be very secure and stable. One stand would be enough to lift the front. Weight-wise, they would probably be less than a hydraulic system (the master side is 90 lbs., the slave side is 80 lbs.), and it could be a manual crank system, or driven by an electric motor. The sentiment that torsilastics benefit from having the load taken off while parked for long periods might not be accurate. My 1982 Model 10 that I bought as a parts vehicle, sat in the same spot for fourteen years, and did not loose any height or function at all. (In fact, after getting some wires replaced and getting the prime back in the fuel system, I started it up and drove it 75 miles, shaking out rust particles all the way). :o
Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
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DoubleEagle
 
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